viernes, 20 de abril de 2018

Lagoon Nebula Zoom and Flythrough

Two Hubble Views of the Same Stellar Nursery | NASA

Two Hubble Views of the Same Stellar Nursery | NASA



Two Hubble Views 

of the Same 

Stellar Nursery

These NASA Hubble Space Telescope images compare two diverse views of the roiling heart of a vast stellar nursery, known as the Lagoon Nebula. The images, one taken in visible and the other in infrared light, celebrate Hubble’s 28th anniversary in space.
The colorful visible-light image at left reveals a fantasy landscape of ridges, cavities, and mountains of gas and dust. This dust-and-gas landscape is being sculpted by powerful ultraviolet radiation and hurricane-like stellar winds unleashed by a monster young star. Located at the center of the photo, the star, known as Herschel 36, is about 200,000 times brighter than our Sun. This hefty star is 32 times more massive than our Sun and 40,000 degrees Kelvin. Herschel 36 is still very active because it is young by a star’s standards, only 1 million years old.
dual image of nebula one colorful, one blue white - annotations
These NASA Hubble Space Telescope images compare two diverse views of the roiling heart of a vast stellar nursery, known as the Lagoon Nebula. The images, one taken in visible and the other in infrared light, celebrate Hubble’s 28th anniversary in space.
Credits: NASA, ESA, and STScI
A monster young star 200,000 times brighter than our Sun is blasting powerful ultraviolet radiation and hurricane-like stellar winds, carving out a fantasy landscape of ridges, cavities, and mountains of gas and dust.
The blistering radiation and powerful stellar winds (streams of subatomic particles) are pushing dust away in curtain-like sheets. As the monster star throws off its natal cocoon of material, it is suppressing star formation around it.
However, at the dark edges of this dynamic bubble-shaped ecosystem, stars are forming within dense clouds of gas and dust. Dark, elephant-like “trunks” of material represent dense pieces of the cocoon that are resistant to erosion by the searing ultraviolet light and serve as incubators for fledgling stars.
The star-filled image at right, taken by Hubble in near-infrared light, reveals a very different view of the Lagoon Nebula compared to its visible-light portrait. Making infrared observations of the cosmos allows astronomers to penetrate vast clouds of gas and dust to uncover hidden gems. Hubble’s view offers a sneak peek at the dramatic vistas NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope will provide.
This video zooms into the core of a rich star-birth region called the Lagoon Nebula, located in the constellation Sagittarius in the direction of our Milky Way galaxy’s central bulge.
Credits: NASA, ESA, and G. Bacon, D. Player, J. DePasquale, F. Summers, and Z. Levay (STScI) Acknowledgement: Fujii, Digitized Sky Survey, ESO/VPHAS, and Crisp
The most obvious difference between Hubble’s infrared and visible photos of this region is the abundance of stars that fill the infrared field of view. Most of them are more distant, background stars located behind the nebula itself. However, some of these pinpricks of light are young stars within the Lagoon Nebula. The giant star Herschel 36, near the center of the frame, shines even brighter in this infrared view.
Dark smudges known as Bok globules mark the thickest parts of the nebula, where dust protects still-forming stars and their planets. While Hubble cannot penetrate these dusty clumps, Webb will be able to see through them.
VIDEO
The Lagoon Nebula resides 4,000 light-years away. The image shows a region of the nebula measuring about 4 light-years across.
The observations were taken by Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 between Feb. 12 and Feb. 18, 2018.
For additional images and videos, visit: http://hubblesite.org/news_release/news/2018-21
For NASA's Hubble website: www.nasa.gov/hubble
For Hubble Europe's release: www.spacetelescope.org/
For the 1996 Hubble Lagoon Nebula Release: http://hubblesite.org/images/news/release/1996-38

Donna Weaver / Ray Villard
Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Maryland
410-338-4493 / 410-338-4514
dweaver@stsci.edu / villard@stsci.edu
Last Updated: April 19, 2018
Editor: Karl Hille

Celebrating 28 Years of the Hubble Space Telescope | NASA

Celebrating 28 Years of the Hubble Space Telescope | NASA



Celebrating 28 Years 

of the Hubble 

Space Telescope

aqua, magenta, black, colorful clouds in space
This colorful image, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, celebrates the Earth-orbiting observatory’s 28th anniversary of viewing the heavens, giving us a window seat to the universe’s extraordinary stellar tapestry of birth and destruction. At the center of this image is a monster young star 200,000 times brighter than our Sun that is blasting powerful ultraviolet radiation and hurricane-like stellar winds, carving out a fantasy landscape of ridges, cavities, and mountains of gas and dust.
This mayhem is all happening at the heart of the Lagoon Nebula, a vast stellar nursery located 4,000 light-years away, visible in binoculars as merely a smudge of light with a bright core.
The giant star, called Herschel 36, is bursting out of its natal cocoon of material, unleashing blistering radiation and torrential stellar winds, which are streams of subatomic particles, that push dust away in curtain-like sheets. This action resembles the Sun bursting through the clouds at the end of an afternoon thunderstorm.
Herschel 36’s violent activity has blasted holes in the bubble-shaped cloud, allowing astronomers to study this action-packed stellar breeding ground. The hefty star is 32 times more massive than our Sun and its temperature is 40,000 degrees kelvin; it is nearly nine times our Sun’s diameter. Herschel 36 is still very active because it is young by a star’s standards, only 1 million years old. Based on its mass, it will live for another 5 million years. In comparison, our smaller Sun is 5 billion years old and will live another 5 billion years.
The image shows a region of the nebula measuring about 4 light-years across.
Image Credit: NASA, ESA, and STScI
Last Updated: April 20, 2018
Editor: Yvette Smith

Jupiter’s Great Red Spot, Spotted | NASA

Jupiter’s Great Red Spot, Spotted | NASA





Jupiter’s 

Great Red Spot, Spotted

Jupiter
This image of Jupiter’s iconic Great Red Spot and surrounding turbulent zones was captured by NASA’s Juno spacecraft.
The color-enhanced image is a combination of three separate images taken on April 1 between 3:09 a.m. PDT (6:09 a.m. EDT) and 3:24 a.m. PDT (6:24 a.m. EDT), as Juno performed its 12th close flyby of Jupiter. At the time the images were taken, the spacecraft was 15,379 miles (24,749 kilometers) to 30,633 miles (49,299 kilometers) from the tops of the clouds of the planet at a southern latitude spanning 43.2 to 62.1 degrees.
Citizen scientists Gerald Eichstädt and Seán Doran processed this image using data from the JunoCam imager.
JunoCam's raw images are available for the public to peruse and process into image products at:
More information about Juno is at:
Image credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/ Gerald Eichstädt /Seán Doran
Last Updated: April 19, 2018
Editor: Tony Greicius

Lagoon Nebula (Visible-light View) | NASA

Lagoon Nebula (Visible-light View) | NASA



Lagoon Nebula 

(Visible-light View)

This colorful image, taken by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, celebrates the Earth-orbiting observatory’s 28th anniversary of viewing the heavens, giving us a window seat to the universe’s extraordinary tapestry of stellar birth and destruction.
At the center of the photo, a monster young star 200,000 times brighter than our Sun is blasting powerful ultraviolet radiation and hurricane-like stellar winds, carving out a fantasy landscape of ridges, cavities, and mountains of gas and dust.
laguna nebula
This colorful image, taken by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, celebrates the Earth-orbiting observatory’s 28th anniversary of viewing the heavens, giving us a window seat to the universe’s extraordinary tapestry of stellar birth and destruction.
Credits: NASA, ESA, and STScI
This mayhem is all happening at the heart of the Lagoon Nebula, a vast stellar nursery located 4,000 light-years away and visible in binoculars simply as a smudge of light with a bright core.
The giant star, called Herschel 36, is bursting out of its natal cocoon of material, unleashing blistering radiation and torrential stellar winds (streams of subatomic particles) that push dust away in curtain-like sheets. This action resembles the Sun bursting through the clouds at the end of an afternoon thunderstorm that showers sheets of rainfall.
Herschel 36’s violent activity has blasted holes in the bubble-shaped cloud, allowing astronomers to study this action-packed stellar breeding ground.
The hefty star is 32 times more massive than our Sun, and 40,000 degrees Kelvin. It is nearly nine times our Sun’s diameter. Herschel 36 is still very active because it is young by a star’s standards, only 1 million years old. Based on its mass, it will live for another 5 million years. In comparison, our smaller Sun is 5 billion years old and will live another 5 billion years.
This region epitomizes a typical, raucous stellar nursery full of birth and destruction. The clouds may look majestic and peaceful, but they are in a constant state of flux from the star’s torrent of searing radiation and high-speed particles from stellar winds. As the monster star throws off its natal cocoon of material with its powerful energy, it is suppressing star formation around it.
However, at the dark edges of this dynamic bubble-shaped ecosystem, stars are forming within dense clouds of gas and dust. Dark, elephant-like “trunks” of material represent dense pieces of the cocoon that are resistant to erosion by the searing ultraviolet light and serve as incubators for fledgling stars. They are analogous to desert buttes that resist weather erosion.
The Hubble view shows off the bubble’s 3D structure. Dust pushed away from the star reveals the glowing oxygen gas (in blue) behind the blown-out cavity. Herschel 36’s brilliant light is illuminating the top of the cavity (in yellow). The reddish hue that dominates part of the region is glowing nitrogen. The dark purple areas represent a mixture of hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen.
The image shows a region of the nebula measuring about 4 light-years across.
The observations were taken by Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 between Feb. 12 and Feb. 18, 2018.
The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between NASA and ESA (European Space Agency). NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, manages the telescope. The Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore conducts Hubble science operations. STScI is operated for NASA by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., in Washington, D.C.
For additional images and videos, visit: http://hubblesite.org/news_release/news/2018-21
For NASA's Hubble website: www.nasa.gov/hubble
For Hubble Europe's release: www.spacetelescope.org/
For the 1996 Hubble Lagoon Nebula Release: http://hubblesite.org/images/news/release/1996-38

Donna Weaver / Ray Villard
Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Maryland
410-338-4493 / 410-338-4514
dweaver@stsci.edu / villard@stsci.edu
Last Updated: April 19, 2018
Editor: Karl Hille

Científicos chinos encuentran semiconductor dúctil para electrónicos flexibles - INVDES

Científicos chinos encuentran semiconductor dúctil para electrónicos flexibles - INVDES

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Científicos chinos encuentran semiconductor dúctil para electrónicos flexibles

Un grupo de científicos chinos encontró un tipo de semiconductor inorgánico, el cual tiene buena ductilidad y flexibilidad a temperatura ambiente, por lo que se puede emplear en electrónicos flexibles.
Desarrollado por investigadores del Instituto de Cerámica de Shanghai, el resultado fue publicado en “Nature Materials” del mes de abril.
La ductilidad es común en metales pero es raramente observada en semiconductores inorgánicos, especialmente a temperatura ambiente. La mayoría de los materiales semiconductores son quebradizo y no se pueden doblar, estirar o comprimir.
El semiconductor recién descubierto, a-Ag2S, es dúctil como el metal y cambia fácilmente de forma en vez de romperse por deformación externa, indica la investigación.
Se espera que el material se aplique en tecnologías electrónicas flexibles como dispositivos portátiles.
Para la aplicación de electrónicos flexibles, el equipo de investigación también produjo una película delgada hecha de a-Ag2S y encontró que tenía una gran capacidad de deformación y buenas propiedades eléctricas.
Fuente: Xinhua

Presentan un editor matemático que convierte fórmulas y signos a lenguaje braille - INVDES

Presentan un editor matemático que convierte fórmulas y signos a lenguaje braille - INVDES

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Presentan un editor matemático que convierte fórmulas y signos a lenguaje braille

La Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM) y la ONCE presentaron este jueves ‘Edico’, el primer editor matemático accesible que permite a alumnos con discapacidad visual seguir las clases más complejas de matemáticas, física o química en tiempo real, gracias a la transcripción automática a braille, voz o vista adaptada a todo tipo de fórmulas o aprendizajes.
La herramienta ha sido presentada en la Facultad de Matemáticas de la UCM por el rector de la Universidad, Carlos Andradas, y el director general de la ONCE, Ángel Sánchez. Estuvieron acompañados por la profesora de la Facultad de Informática y coordinadora del proyecto, María Guijarro, y el profesor de la ONCE y experto en la materia Jaime Muñoz y dos alumnas que hicieron una práctica ‘in situ’ con ‘Edico’, Isabel Vera y Alba García.
Según ha explicado el profesor Muñoz, ‘Edico’ permite al docente que haga “lo mismo que con el resto de su alumnado, sin ese obstáculo que podría ser el desconocimiento del braille”. Muñoz desarrolló el funcionamiento de esta novedosa herramienta, a partir de códigos braille en seis y ocho puntos, que permite estudiar a alumnos desde Primaria y que se materializa en tres ventanas de visualización: una con la que teclea el usuario, otra de consulta para el docente y una tercera con la línea braille.
‘Edico’, agrega Muñoz, “es adaptable según el nivel y las necesidades del alumno” y cuenta también con una calculadora, permite la visualización y la impresión en braille, además de ofrecer tablas integradas.
Innovación
La profesora Guijarro calificó la herramienta de “puntera, revolucionaria e innovadora” y agradeció a las entidades que la han impulsado (Cidat, Área educativa de la ONCE y UCM) haberla permitido participar en ella.
Durante su intervención, el decano de la Facultad de Matemáticas, Antonio Bru, ha puesto el acento en la “sensibilidad” de su ámbito con los alumnos con discapacidad y ha asegurado que seguirá colaborando en iniciativas similares para mejorar la vida de todas las personas.
En la misma línea se pronunció el rector, Carlos Andradas, que asegura que ‘Edico’ “mejorará la calidad de vida y el acceso al conocimiento de muchas personas” y confirma su apuesta “por una universidad abierta a todos y que incluya a todos”. Andradas afirma que la herramienta supone “un paso cualitativo importante de innovación y desarrollo” a escala mundial y afianza aún más la colaboración entre la ONCE y la UCM.
Finalmente, el director general de la ONCE, Ángel Sánchez, ha dicho que si “la información es poder, el acceso a la información es poder hacer”. Por ello se ha felicitado porque la nueva herramienta “va a eliminar muchas barreras y va a poner al alcance de las personas ciegas el conocimiento de las ciencias, matemáticas, física y química, tengan las capacidades que tengan”. Además, ha apuntado que ya se está trabajando en una nueva versión de ‘Edico’, para Estadística y Matemáticas financieras.
Fuente: rtve.es