viernes, 20 de octubre de 2017

CICATRICES (IN)VISIBLES || NOVEDAD EDITORIAL



NOTICIA A LECTORES, SEGUIDORES, BUSCADORES Y AMIGOS DE CONEXIONES ETÉREAS

el dispensador dice: desde el domingo 22 de octubre hasta el domingo 29 de octubre el blog "el dispensador" no se actualizará... razones personales me obligan a "desaparecer" por un lapso, motivado ello en que debo someterme a una cirugía que luego demandará un largo tiempo de recuperación. Espero encontrarlos al regreso, en alguna ocasión, alguna vez, o siempre. Les dejo un abrazo de eternidades compartidas. Gracias por acompañarme en esta aventura de las letras, las ideas, las reflexiones, y sobre todo, las experiencias que van dejando huellas en nuestro espíritu. Valga un AMÉN por todos nosotros. OCTUBRE 20, 2017.-
La imagen puede contener: 1 persona
“Nuestro propósito fundamental en la vida es ayudar a los demás. Si no puedes ayudarles, al menos, no les causes daño”. ~ S.S. el Dalai Lama
Thuk Je Che TibetLa imagen puede contener: cielo, exterior y agua
Somos lo que pensamos. Todo lo que somos surge con nuestros pensamientos. Con nuestros pensamientos, construimos el mundo.

We are what we think. All that we are arises with our thoughts. With our thoughts, we make the world.

Thuk Je Che Tibet

NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory Spots a Lunar Transit | NASA

NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory Spots a Lunar Transit | NASA





NASA's SDO Spots a Lunar Transit

animation of SDO observations of lunar transit
On Oct. 19, 2017, the Moon photobombed NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, when it crossed the spacecraft’s view of the Sun, treating us to these shadowy images. The lunar transit lasted about 45 minutes, between 3:41 and 4:25 p.m. EDT, with the Moon covering about 26 percent of the Sun at the peak of its journey. The Moon’s shadow obstructs SDO’s otherwise constant view of the Sun, and the shadow’s edge is sharp and distinct, since the Moon has no atmosphere which would distort sunlight.
SDO captured these images in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light that shows solar material heated to more than 10 million degrees Fahrenheit. This kind of light is invisible to human eyes, but colorized here in green.
Related:

Image credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/SDO/Joy Ng
Text: Lina TranNASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
Last Updated: Oct. 20, 2017
Editor: Rob Garner

Hubble Unravels a Twisted Cosmic Knot | NASA

Hubble Unravels a Twisted Cosmic Knot | NASA



Hubble Unravels a 

Twisted Cosmic Knot

NGC 2623
#SpotHubble graphic
Got a stellar Hubble image on a T-shirt? Or maybe you’ve spotted a Hubble tattoo! Share your photos on Instagram, Twitter, Flickr and Facebook with #SpotHubble and maybe you’ll get a shout-out from @NASAHubble!
Credits: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Jenny Hottle
This image, captured by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows what happens when two galaxies become one. The twisted cosmic knot seen here is NGC 2623 — or Arp 243 — and is located about 250 million light-years away in the constellation of Cancer (The Crab).
NGC 2623 gained its unusual and distinctive shape as the result of a major collision and subsequent merger between two separate galaxies. This violent encounter caused clouds of gas within the two galaxies to become compressed and stirred up, in turn triggering a sharp spike of star formation. This active star formation is marked by speckled patches of bright blue; these can be seen clustered both in the center and along the trails of dust and gas forming NGC 2623’s sweeping curves (known as tidal tails). These tails extend for roughly 50 000 light-years from end to end. Many young, hot, newborn stars form in bright stellar clusters — at least 170 such clusters are known to exist within NGC 2623.
NGC 2623 is in a late stage of merging. It is thought that the Milky Way will eventually resemble NGC 2623 when it collides with our neighboring galaxy, the Andromeda Galaxy, in 4 billion years’ time.
Text credit: ESA (European Space Agency)
Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA
Last Updated: Oct. 20, 2017
Editor: Rob Garner

Exploring the Structure of the Ring Nebula

Messier 57 (The Ring Nebula) | NASA

Messier 57 (The Ring Nebula) | NASA



collage of Hubble Messier object images and portrait of Messier
Oct. 19, 2017


Messier 57 (The Ring Nebula)

Ring Nebula
Credits: NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage (STScI/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration
M57, or the Ring Nebula, is a planetary nebula, the glowing remains of a sun-like star. The tiny white dot in the center of the nebula is the star’s hot core, called a white dwarf. M57 is about 2,000 light-years away in the constellation Lyra, and is best observed during August. Discovered by the French astronomer Antoine Darquier de Pellepoix in 1779, the Ring Nebula has an apparent magnitude of 8.8 and can be spotted with moderately sized telescopes.
M57 is tilted toward Earth so that astronomers see the ring face-on. This gorgeous, high-resolution Hubble image helped astronomers determine that the nebula’s shape is more complicated than initially thought. The blue gas in the nebula’s center is actually a football-shaped structure seen end-on that pierces the red, doughnut-shaped material. The inner rim of the ring displays an intricate structure of dark, irregular knots of dense gas that the stellar winds have not yet been able to blow away. The knots and their tails look like spokes in a bicycle.
This image of M57 has been colorized to illustrate the nebula’s chemical composition. The deep blue color in the center represents helium, the light blue color of the inner ring is the glow of hydrogen and oxygen, and the reddish color of the outer ring is from nitrogen and sulfur.
This video begins with a ground-based view of the constellation Lyra and zooms into Hubble’s image of the Ring Nebula. It ends with a 3-D model that showcases the structure of the nebula.
Credits: NASA, ESA, and G. Bacon, F. Summers and Mary Estacion (STScI)
For more information on Hubble’s observations of M57, see:
locator star chart for M57
This star chart for M57 represents the view from mid-northern latitudes for the given month and time.
Credits: Image courtesy of Stellarium
Last Updated: Oct. 19, 2017
Editor: Rob Garner

Zoom into Dumbbell Nebula

Messier 27 (The Dumbbell Nebula) | NASA

Messier 27 (The Dumbbell Nebula) | NASA



collage of Hubble Messier object images and portrait of Messier



Messier 27 (The Dumbbell Nebula)

Dumbbell Nebula
Credits: NASA/ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)
Spotted by Charles Messier in 1764, M27 was the first planetary nebula ever discovered. The term “planetary nebula” is a bit of a misnomer based on the nebula’s round, planet-like appearance when viewed through smaller telescopes. The nebula is the result of an old star that has shed its outer layers in a glowing display of color. In Hubble’s image, which shows a small portion of M27, blue represents oxygen, green represents hydrogen, and red indicates sulfur and nitrogen.
M27 hosts many knots of gas and dust. As depicted in Hubble’s image, some look like fingers pointing at the central star, located just off the upper left of the image; others are isolated clouds, some with and some without tails. Their sizes typically range from 17 billion to 56 billion kilometers, which is several times larger than the distance from the sun to Pluto. Each contains as much mass as three Earths.
These dense knots of gas and dust seem to be a natural part of the evolution of planetary nebulas. They form when the stellar winds are not powerful enough to blow away a larger clump of matter but are able to blow away smaller particles, creating a trail behind the clump. The shapes of these knots change as the nebula expands. Similar knots have been discovered in other nearby planetary nebulas that are all part of the same evolutionary scheme.
Also known as the Dumbbell Nebula, M27 resides more than 1,200 light-years away in the constellation Vulpecula. With an apparent magnitude of 7.5, the nebula can be spotted with a small telescope most easily in September. 
This video begins with a ground-based image of the entire Dumbbell Nebula and zooms into the portion of the nebula imaged by Hubble.
Credits: NASA and L. Barranger (STScI/AVL)
For more information about Hubble’s observations of M27, see:
locator star chart for M27
This star chart for M27 represents the view from mid-northern latitudes for the given month and time.
Credits: Image courtesy of Stellarium
Last Updated: Oct. 19, 2017
Editor: Rob Garner

Messier 43 | NASA

Messier 43 | NASA







Messier 43

M43
Credits: NASA, ESA, M. Robberto (Space Telescope Science Institute/ESA) and the Hubble Space Telescope Orion Treasury Project Team
hot, young stars in M43
This Hubble image, assembled from observations at visible and infrared wavelengths of light, shows several of the brilliant, hot, young stars in M43.
Credits: ESA/Hubble & NASA
Separated from the Orion Nebula (M42) by only a dark lane of dust, M43 was recognized as a distinct nebula by the French astronomer Jean-Jacques d’Ortous de Mairan in 1731. A massive star is illuminating M43 and sculpting its landscape of dust and gas with its radiation. Astronomers call the area a miniature Orion Nebula because of its small size and the single star that is shaping it. The Orion Nebula itself is much larger and has four hefty stars that are carving the dust-and-gas terrain.
Both nebulas are part of the massive stellar nursery called the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex, which includes several other nebulas, such as the Horsehead Nebula (Barnard 33) and the Flame Nebula (NGC 2024). At the center of this view of M43, taken using infrared and visible-light cameras on Hubble, sits the massive star that is warping the gas and dust around it.
Located 1,600 light-years from Earth, M43 has an apparent magnitude of 9. It can be spotted through a small telescope and is best observed during January.
For more information about Hubble’s observations of M43, see:
locator star chart for M43
This star chart for M43 represents the view from mid-northern latitudes for the given month and time.
Credits: Image courtesy of Stellarium
Last Updated: Oct. 19, 2017
Editor: Rob Garner

Messier 42 (The Orion Nebula) | NASA

Messier 42 (The Orion Nebula) | NASA



collage of Hubble Messier object images and portrait of Messier

Messier 42 (The Orion Nebula)

Orion Nebula
Credits: NASA, ESA, M. Robberto (Space Telescope Science Institute/ESA) and the Hubble Space Telescope Orion Treasury Project Team
M42’s Trapezium cluster
Appearing like glistening precious stones, M42’s Trapezium cluster, named for the trapezoidal arrangement of its central massive stars, is seen in this infrared Hubble image. All of the members of the Trapezium were born together in this hotbed of star formation.
Credits: K.L. Luhman (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Mass.); and G. Schneider, E. Young, G. Rieke, A. Cotera, H. Chen, M. Rieke, R. Thompson (Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, Ariz.) and NASA/ESA
protoplanetary disk in Orion Nebula
Resembling an interstellar Frisbee, the dark feature in these two Hubble images is a protoplanetary disk of dust seen edge-on around a newborn star in M42. The two images show the disk through two different sets of filters: one to probe the disk’s chemical composition (left) and another to reduce the brightness of the nebula, revealing brighter regions above and below the disk that betray the presence of the star (right). Because the disk is edge-on, its star is largely hidden, but the disk may be an embryonic planetary system in the making. Our solar system probably formed out of such a disk 4.5 billion years ago.
Credits: Mark McCaughrean (Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy), C. Robert O'Dell (Rice University) and NASA
Believed to be the cosmic fire of creation by the Maya of Mesoamerica, M42 blazes brightly in the constellation Orion. Popularly called the Orion Nebula, this stellar nursery has been known to many different cultures throughout human history. The nebula is only 1,500 light-years away, making it the closest large star-forming region to Earth and giving it a relatively bright apparent magnitude of 4. Because of its brightness and prominent location just below Orion’s belt, M42 can be spotted with the naked eye, while offering an excellent peek at stellar birth for those with telescopes. It is best observed during January.
The Mayan culture’s likening of the Orion Nebula to a cosmic fire of creation is very apt. The nebula is an enormous cloud of dust and gas where vast numbers of new stars are being forged. Its bright, central region is the home of four massive, young stars that shape the nebula. The four hefty stars are called the Trapezium because they are arranged in a trapezoidal pattern. Ultraviolet light unleashed by these stars is carving a cavity in the nebula and disrupting the growth of hundreds of smaller stars.
This stunning Hubble image offers the sharpest view of the Orion Nebula ever obtained. Created using 520 different Hubble exposures taken in multiple wavelengths of light, this mosaic contains over one billion pixels. Hubble imaged most of the nebula, but ground-based images were used to fill in the gaps in its observations. The orange color in the image can be attributed to hydrogen, green represents oxygen, and the red represents both sulfur and observations made in infrared light.
For more information about Hubble’s observations of M42, see:
locator star chart for M42
This star chart for M42 represents the view from mid-northern latitudes for the given month and time.
Credits: Image courtesy of Stellarium
Last Updated: Oct. 19, 2017
Editor: Rob Garner

Zoom Inside the Heart of the Trifid Nebula

Messier 20 (The Trifid Nebula) | NASA

Messier 20 (The Trifid Nebula) | NASA



collage of Hubble Messier object images and portrait of Messier
Oct. 19, 2017


Messier 20 (The Trifid Nebula)



Trifid Nebula
Credits: NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI); Acknowledgment: F. Yusef-Zadeh (Northwestern Univ.)
star-forming cloud of gas and dust in M20
This Hubble image reveals a star-forming cloud of gas and dust in M20 being torn apart by radiation from a massive nearby star, just beyond the top of the frame. Two thin, finger-like jets protrude from the head of a dense cloud in the upper left of the image, which might be forming new stars at their tips. The jets, each roughly three-quarters of a light-year long, are being eroded by the radiation from the massive star. The red in this image represents hydrogen and sulfur, while green represents oxygen.
Credits: NASA/ESA and Jeff Hester (Arizona State University)
Discovered by Charles Messier in 1764, M20 is a star-forming nebula located 9,000 light-years away from Earth in the constellation Sagittarius. Also known as the Trifid Nebula, M20 has an apparent magnitude of 6.3 and can be spotted with a small telescope. It is best observed during August.
This eerie Hubble image features the center of the Trifid Nebula and the three wing-like bands of thick dust for which the nebula was named. A group of recently formed, massive, bright stars toward the center of the nebula is easily visible. These stars are releasing a flood of ultraviolet radiation that dramatically influences the structure and evolution of the surrounding nebula. Star formation is no longer occurring in the immediate vicinity of this group of bright stars because their intense radiation has blown away the gas and dust from which new stars are made.
The image’s stair-step appearance results from the design of the camera used to take the exposures. The camera consisted of four light detectors, one of which provided a higher resolution but had a smaller field of view than the other three. Because the detector with the higher resolution did not cover as much area as the others, black regions were left when the images from all four detectors were combined into one picture. 
This Hubble image of M20 has been colorized to indicate the presence of oxygen, sulfur and hydrogen.
The video zooms into Hubble’s image of the heart of the Trifid Nebula. The zoom starts by looking at the Sagittarius constellation in the night sky and dissolves into the Lagoon Nebula. The video then goes deeper into the sky to show the Trifid Nebula, with the star birth region appearing as the final spectacular image.
Credits: NASA, Z. Levay and L. Barranger (STScI)
For more information about Hubble’s observations of M20, see:
locator star chart for M20
This star chart for M20 represents the view from mid-northern latitudes for the given month and time.
Credits: Image courtesy of Stellarium
Last Updated: Oct. 19, 2017
Editor: Rob Garner

Messier 17 (The Omega Nebula or Swan Nebula) | NASA

Messier 17 (The Omega Nebula or Swan Nebula) | NASA





collage of Hubble Messier object images and portrait of Messier

Messier 17 (The Omega Nebula 

or Swan Nebula)

M17 as observed by Hubble
Credits: NASA, H. Ford (JHU), G. Illingworth (UCSC/LO), M. Clampin (STScI), G. Hartig (STScI), the ACS Science Team and ESA
region of M17 seen by Hubble
This Hubble image captures a small region within M17. This hotbed of star formation is colored according to the chemical elements present. Red represents sulfur, green indicates hydrogen and blue represents oxygen.
Credits: ESA, NASA and J. Hester (Arizona State University)
Illuminated by ultraviolet radiation from young, massive stars on the right side of this photograph, M17, also known as the Omega Nebula or Swan Nebula, is one of the largest star-forming regions in the Milky Way galaxy. Hubble’s stunning image of a central portion of the nebula has been colorized to highlight certain wavelengths of light. Green represents oxygen while red reveals hydrogen and infrared light.
The Omega Nebula was discovered in 1745 by the Swiss astronomer Jean-Philippe Loys de Chéseaux. It is located 5,500 light-years from Earth in the constellation Sagittarius. The nebula has an apparent magnitude of 6 and can be seen with a pair of binoculars. M17, which appears near M16 and M18 in the sky, is best viewed on clear nights in August.
M17 contains one of our galaxy’s youngest star clusters, at only 1 million years old. However, many of the young stars in this cluster are impossible to see because of the gas and dust that surrounds them. The powerful radiation from the young stars evaporates and erodes the dense clouds of cold gas in which new stars form. One such pocket of gas is seen at the center of the brightest region of the nebula (near the bottom of this image) and is about 10 times larger than our solar system. Other dense pockets of gas have formed the remarkable dark features jutting inward from the bottom left corner of the image.
For more information about Hubble’s observations of M17, see:
locator star chart for M17
This star chart for M17 represents the view from mid-northern latitudes for the given month and time.
Credits: Image courtesy of Stellarium
Last Updated: Oct. 19, 2017
Editor: Rob Garner

Zoom-in to the Pleiades

Messier 45 (The Pleiades) | NASA

Messier 45 (The Pleiades) | NASA



collage of Hubble Messier object images and portrait of Messier
Messier 45 (The Pleiades)
interstellar cloud in Pleiades
Credits: NASA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA); Acknowledgment: George Herbig and Theodore Simon (Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii)
In this image, which combines visible and infrared observations, Hubble has captured the eerie, wispy tendrils of an interstellar cloud being destroyed by one of the brightest stars in M45. Like fireworks illuminating dark clouds at night, the star’s light is reflecting off the surface of pitch-black clouds of cold gas laced with dust. This produces a reflection nebula.
Commonly called the Pleiades or Seven Sisters, M45 is known as an open star cluster. It contains over a thousand stars that are loosely bound by gravity, but it is visually dominated by a handful of its brightest members.
One of these stars, Merope, is located just outside the frame of this image to the upper right. The colorful rays of light at the upper right, emanating from the star, are an optical phenomenon produced within the telescope. The nearly straight, blue-white wisps pointing toward the upper right are streams of large dust particles. As the cloud moves toward Merope, its smaller dust particles are slowed down by the star’s radiation pressure more than the larger particles are. The large dust particles continue on toward the star while the smaller particles are left behind at the lower left of the picture.
The Pleiades cluster has been observed since ancient times, so it has no known discoverer. However, Galileo Galilei, the Italian scientist best known for discovering the largest moons of Jupiter and championing a heliocentric model of the solar system, was the first to observe the Pleiades through a telescope. M45 is located an average distance of 445 light-years from Earth in the constellation Taurus. It has an apparent magnitude of 1.6 and can be seen with the naked eye. The cluster is best observed during January.
This video begins with a ground-based image of the Pleiades. It zooms into Merope, eventually settling on Hubble’s image of the reflection nebula that is being destroyed by the star’s radiation.
Credits: Anim.: STScI AVL; Images: Terence Dickinson (Pleiades w/ Jupiter, Saturn, Hyades); STScI Digitized Sky Survey; Chuck Vaughn (amateur astrophotographer, 85-min. exposure w/ 12.5" f/9 Ritchey-Chretien telescope); Hubble Heritage Team (NASA, STScI/AURA)
For more information about Hubble’s observations of M45, see:
locator star chart for M45
This star chart for M45 represents the view from mid-northern latitudes for the given month and time.
Credits: Image courtesy of Stellarium
Last Updated: Oct. 19, 2017
Editor: Rob Garner

LEYENDA DE LIBREROS || Emilio Lledó gana el Premio Leyenda del Gremio de Libreros de Madrid | Madrid | EL PAÍS

Emilio Lledó gana el Premio Leyenda del Gremio de Libreros de Madrid | Madrid | EL PAÍS

Emilio Lledó gana el Premio Leyenda del Gremio de Libreros de Madrid

Los libreros premian seis categorías: Leyenda, el más relevante, Ficción, Álbum ilustrado, Cómic, Ensayo, Poesía

Emilio Lledó, en su domicilio de Madrid.

Emilio Lledó, en su domicilio de Madrid. 





El filósofo y escritor Emilio Lledó ha ganado este jueves el Premio Leyenda que cada año otorga el Gremio de Libreros de Madrid. Por unanimidad, el jurado ha querido reconocer la carrera del académico por su pasión por el conocimiento y su amor por la escuela pública, los maestros, la lectura y los libreros, lo que le hace, según los libreros de Madrid, "memoria y palabra al mismo tiempo". Lledó fue galardonado con el Premio Princesa de Asturias de Comunicación y Humanidades en 2015, además de atesorar, entre otros, el Premio Nacional de las Letras Españolas y el Premio Alexander von Humboldt por su labor investigadora.
Leyenda es el galardón más importante que otorga el Gremio, pero además premian, al ganador y al finalista en las categorías de Ficción, Álbum ilustrado, Cómic, Ensayo, Poesía. El Mejor Libro de Ficción ha recaído en Vivian Gornic por su obra Apegos feroces (publicado en 2005 en EE.UU) en la que se aborda las relaciones familiares y el desencuentro generacional. "Un libro memorialista en el que la autora desgrana el camino, accidentado y convulso, que le lleva a encontrar su sitio, a descubrir la mujer que quiere ser", en palabras del jurado.
En la categoría de Ensayo, Rebecca Solnit ha sido premiada por su obra Los hombres me explican cosas, un conjunto de textos que hablan sobre la desigualdad entre mujeres y hombres y la violencia machista. La artista Bárbara Fiore se ha hecho con el galardón a Mejor Álbum Ilustrado por el libro ¿Mau iz io? del autor Carson Ellis. Black Hammer Volumen 1: Orígenes Secretos, ha conseguido el del Mejor Cómic del año. La obra de los autores Jeff Lemire, Dean Ormston y el músico David Stewart, homenajea al mundo de los superhéroes clásicos que va de los años treinta a los sesenta. La obra bebe de escritores de terror como H. P. Lovecraft, de ficción como Arthur C. Clarke o del mundo Marvel como Stan Lee.
Además, este año el Gremio de Libreros ha añadido una nueva categoría en el certamen con el premio de Mejor Libro de Poesía, concedido al escritor Abraham Gragera por su poemario a O Futuro. Dividido en siete partes, Gragera "desgrana su visión del mundo con una poesía que ilumina sin estridencias ni falsas retóricas un recopilatorio de su propia alma que lo conforman un poeta de deslumbrante futuro", ha citado el jurado.